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This Week on the Guitar Blog...

 

Developing Patterns (Rock, Pop, Blues, Jazz)
This episode of the GuitarBlog works through several scale types all applied using small regional neck patterns for easier scale development. These small scale-chunks, (referred to in the lesson as, "Developing Patterns"), are used to outline the scale within a very limited area of the fingerboard. Once the Developing Pattern is established, licks are then constructed within those areas that will stylistically lean toward a particular musical genre. In the lesson, the styles of; Rock, Pop, Blues and Jazz are covered.

 

Video - PART 1: In the first video, we look into scale segments used as developing patterns for, Rock and Pop music. The scales of Natural Minor and Mixolydian mode are applied in the fifth position, between 4th to 2nd strings. The Rock idea, in example one, uses the, "A Natural Minor," scale. The Pop application in example two, uses the very cool sounds taken from the fifth mode of the major scale, "Mixolydian Mode" off the tonic of "A."

 

membersVideo - PART 2: The second half of the lesson incorporates Blues Scale and the Major Scale for use within the styles of Blues and traditional Jazz. Example three, looks at what is probably the most popular scale in modern guitar, the "Blues Scale." A developing pattern for the "A Blues" scale is outlined in the 5th position. The Blues lick uses bends, pull-off's and slides to generate that authentic Blues sound. Example four uses a Jazz format to explore the use of the Major Scale over a traditional jazz II-V-I progression. The developing pattern is once again applied in 5th position using the "A Major Scale." The lick follows suit within that position applying a jazzy 8th-note triplet swing feel.

 

Be sure to watch Part 2 of this lesson and download the handout in the members area of CreativeGuitarStudio.com

 

RELATED VIDEOS:
"Developing Patterns (Rock, Pop, Blues, Jazz)"


Using Scale Patterns to Find Licks

From Guitar Scales to Guitar Licks 

 

For more resources on the topic of Harmony and Theory, visit the course pages at Creative Guitar Studio / Harmony and Theory.

 

For some extra jam practice this week, check out my FREE JamTrax on the JamTrax Page. Please consider visiting my PayPal Donation Page to help support the web-site. Have a great week everyone, and all the best!

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I have hundreds of lessons here on my Blog site... Many have FREE MP3 Jam Tracks as well as PDF Lesson Handouts. Use the Search Box (up in the top right navigation menu) to find video lessons & blogs. My most recent guitar lesson videos are below... Enjoy and please consider a donation to help support this Guitar Blog & the Creative Guitar Studio online lesson projects.

 

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August 19, 2016:
Box Neck Learning Systems

 

PART ONE: Outlines two core principles of the most popular box system, the "Square Box." This box covers all strings (1 through 6), in a three fret range. We study rhythm guitar applications within the "square box" region with a demonstration of the common "I-IV-V" chord progression. We then expand what can be applied within the box through the organization of a melody part played in the range. The flexibility of the box system is highlighted by changing the key using the box principle.


membersPART TWO: The second half of this lesson uses a couple of other popular box strategies. These will be based on what is often referred to as the, "Rectangle Box." This rectangle box-outline produces an area on the fingerboard that covers four frets. In example three, the large rectangle box is given with a riff that applies chord shots alongside filler licks. In example four, the rectangle box shrinks into a smaller box pattern covering three strings, (2 through 4). A pop-melody is given for practice that applies a picked pattern composed from the "D Mixolydian Mode."


Watch Part 2 of this lesson and download the handout and jamtrack in the members area of CreativeGuitarStudio.com

GUITAR THEORY: Box Neck Learning Systems

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