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Postings - February 2013:
Basic Fingerpicking Patterns | Fingerboard Hand Development | Theory and Application of Extensions | Arpeggio Design and Function |

Creative Guitar Studio

February 01, 2013:
Basic Fingerpicking Patterns

Fingerpicked patterns are one of the best ways to develop fingerstyle guitar technique. The plucking hand learns to track the fretting hand through repetitive picked patterns. And, when this approach is combined with the use of common open position chords, the practice is perfect for both beginner and intermediate students. Watch the video lesson to find out more and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

FINGERSTYLE GUITAR: Basic Fingerpicking Patterns

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February 08, 2013:
Fingerboard Hand Development

One of the most challenging aspects of guitar technique, for both beginners and intermediate students, is that of gaining the effective use of all four of the fret-board hands fingers. The solutiuon to this issue can be attained through a series of well thought out exercises. Great strides can be made with fret-board hand dexterity and competence with the right daily exercises. Watch the video lesson to find out more and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

GUITAR TECHNIQUE: Fingerboard Hand Development

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February 15, 2013:
Theory & Application of Extensions

The application of extended chords can be far less intimidating by realizing that any major, minor or dominant chord type can be extended with a 9, 11, or 13 extension. With a few simple rules of music theory, the application of these very cool chord extensions can really spice up any piece of music. Watch the video lesson to find out more and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

MUSIC THEORY: Theory & Application of Extended Chords

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February 22, 2013:
Arpeggio Design & Function

Proper study of arpeggio design and function relies on both finding a balance between good technical practice and upon knowing several options for how arpeggios can be applied. When we only apply an arpeggio upon the chord it is directly related to, (ie.,. using G Major arpeggio on a G Major chord), we are losing out on all of the diatonic substitution properties that are available from arpeggios. Watch the video lesson to find out more and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

GUITAR THEORY: Arpeggio Design & Function