Q and A Archive

line

Subscribe!

 

 

home > recent posts > 2014 > march

search

Postings - March 2014:
How to Practice Chords | Blues Combination Scales | Chromatic Stealth Tones | Five Tips for Composing |

Creative Guitar Studio

bar

March 07, 2014:
How to Practice Chords

After guitar players complete their initial study of the open position chords, the next step, is to study chords across the remainder of the neck. This can often be the source for a great deal of confusion. Normally, students have difficulty understanding where to begin. This video and accompanying lesson plan work to clear up the often unclear direction to take for, "How to Practice Chords." Watch the video lesson to find out more, and Download the FREE MP3 JamTracks and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

PRACTICE & TRAINING: How to Practice Chords

bar

March 14, 2014:
Blues Combination Scales

Guitar players interested in creating unique sounding blues lines can either learn licks by players who perform these lines, (like Alvin Lee). Or, they can spend time working on combining scales. By combining Minor and Major Pentatonic along with Dorian and Mixolydian we can create very interesting Blues ideas. Watch the video lesson to find out more, and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

GUITAR THEORY: Blues Combination Scales

bar

March 21, 2014:
Chromatic Stealth Tones

Certain guitarists (Peter Frampton) have a way of playing chromatic scale tones in and around the scale tones of the key. These chromatic intervals can seem to move around all of the other tones effortlessly. Their use can be so smoothly executed that the listener will barely notice them. In the video, I cover several ways for how these stealth intervals may be applied. Watch the video lesson to find out more, and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

IMPROVISATION: Chromatic Stealth Tones

bar

March 28, 2014:
Five Tips for Composing

When guitarists want to compose music with lots of background lines, harmony and counter-point the process can quickly feel overwhelming. It's easy to become intimidated and get the feeling you need to know a ton of music theory to go anywhere from it. The reality is that by simply using a few common-sense ideas we can develop solid methods for composing in any style. Watch the video lesson to find out more, and Download the FREE MP3 JamTrack and PDF lesson handout for the practice examples.

SONGWRITING: Five Tips for Composing

bar